Biarri Supporting AMSI Optimise 2018

Another year, another AMSI Optimise! We love this event. Its a perfect opportunity for people who want to network within the mathematical optimisation community across both academia and industry, and public or private practitioners who are interested in the benefits of collaboration with operations research.

We are proud to be the AMSI Optimise industry sponsor for the 2018 theme, ‘Decision Making Under Uncertainty & Humanitarian Applications’ and will have several Biarri-ites attending, as well as one of our co-founders, Joe Forbes, speaking on the topic of Optimisation Under Risk on Day 1.

At Biarri, we recognise the power of Commercial Mathematics is drawn from connecting with the brightest mathematicians and statisticians, and this is one of the great opportunities we have to find hungry people to grow with us solving complex problems for big businesses!

Register now to learn more about AMSI, the latest progress in Operations Research and network with a wide range of academic and industry communities.

See you there!

Agribusiness Optimisation Solutions

Maths and Machine Learning for Agribusinesses

Mathematics powered by computers is changing the world we live in. At Biarri we see this everywhere, across every industry, and I’m sure you do too. Recently we have delivered a number of Machine Learning and Mathematical Optimisation solutions for Agriculture businesses in Australia and were fortunate enough to be invited to speak at the recent Case IH agri-business conference in Mackay.

Ash Nelson, Biarri’s co-founder, presented on Maths and Predictive Analytics for better business decisions. He described how our everyday lives are being changed by corporations leveraging large data sets, advanced statistical analysis and powerful computing resources. Ash then outlined how these same set of technologies can be utilised to improve business decisions in agriculture. This includes optimising agricultural supply chains and port operations, reducing unplanned equipment failures by using intelligent predictive maintenance algorithms or to improve health and safety outcomes for farm workers by better identifying areas of best practice to inform injury prevention initiatives.

Are you interested in leveraging your data using advanced maths to make better business decisions? Don’t hesitate to get in touch with our friendly team.

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The Biarri Score: Predictive Analytics for better integrated healthcare

Many Health and Hospital services around the world have introduced integrated care activities to coordinate Primary (Community and GPs) and Secondary (Hospitals) care levels in order to increase the effectiveness of care being provided at all levels. 

Biarri delivered a predictive data analytics solution which successfully identified hospital patients in the community who were most likely to readmit to hospitals. Statistical analysis proved the Biarri Solution is able to identify the top 1% of the population at risk of hospitalisation with 90% accuracy.

In January 2018, Ron Calvert, the CEO of Gold Coast Health and Hospital Services (GCHHS) was in the news recognising Biarri’s predictive analytics in the form of a ‘Biarri Score’, which predicts an individual’s likelihood of readmission to hospital with ‘remarkable levels of accuracy’. Check out the article here.

The Biarri Score is now in place in the Gold Coast University Hospital emergency department. Also, patient criticality scores are integrated into local GP practices to provide intra-facility collaboration of healthcare services and prevent unnecessary admissions.

This application of Commercial Mathematics has resulted in increasingly better identification of patient who are likely to readmit, in order to improve the effectiveness of the Integrated Care activities and reduce demand on emergency departments.

 

Get in touch to learn more about Biarri’s Predictive Analytics capability or to learn more about applicaitons of Commercial Mathematics in other areas!

Biarri -Hospital and Health Services

Trimming away hospital costs: A bi-product of saving lives with statistics

Healthcare service delivery in most systems can be described as fragmented at best. In many healthcare systems, there has been very little continuity of care and integration for services provided by General Practices (GP), Hospital and Health Services (HHS) and other healthcare providers. Integrated Care is a worldwide trend in healthcare reforms that focuses on co-ordinating these different services.

Read more

Supply Chain, Logistics and Mining at BAM 2016

Supply Chain, Logistics and Mining at BAM 2016

The Biarri Applied Mathematics Conference is on again and registrations are open for 2016. This year BAM will be covering  a range of presentations across supply chain, logistics and mining optimisation. With our supply chains becoming more and more complex don’t miss out on exploring how optimisation can be used.

Extending the MIP toolbox to crack the Liner Shipping Fleet Repositioning Problem

Robin Pearce will be delving into the Liner Shipping Fleet Repositioning Problem (LSFRP) which involves repositioning ships between service routes while maximising profit. This presentation will demonstrate how this problem can become quite large, with multiple ships, thousands of potential cargo transfers and tens of thousands of arcs. A straightforward MIP implementation can solve small scale problems, however the problem quickly becomes intractable..

In this presentation Robin will show us how he has managed to reduce solve times from hours down to a few minutes.

Robin Pearce is a mathematics student at the University of Queensland. After studying a Bachelor of Science with Honours in Applied Mathematics at UQ, he spent two years as a Graduate Fellow with CSIRO working on three-dimensional microstructure modelling. He is now a PhD student with Michael Forbes, once again at UQ. His main topics of interest are the use of lazy constraints and disaggregated Benders decomposition for solving large and difficult integer and mixed-integer programs.

Optimal facility location and equipment selection for whey re-use

Whey is a by-product of cheese making that is a potentially important source of nutrients, but which currently goes to disposal in many parts of the world. In this presentation, Rasul Esmaeilbeigi will analyse the efficiency of investment in whey-processing with the aim of releasing the productive potential of currently unexploited whey supply chains. Rasul will describe a decision support model for production and distribution of products derived from whey that extends a globally inclusive facility location problem. The basic tenet of the model is that equipment selection during the initial stages of facility planning is critical, as capital costs in the early stages of supply chain design go into purchases of new machines and site conditioning. The model selects the optimal combination of whey processing equipment, facility locations and transportation routes subject to budget, equipment availability and final product requirements.

Rasul is currently a PhD. candidate in the school of mathematical and physical sciences at the University of Newcastle. he holds a master’s degree (2014) and a bachelor’s degree (2012) in Industrial Engineering. Rasul has expertise in the field of Mathematical Programming and Combinatorial Optimization and also general knowledge and experience of programming languages for solving large scale optimisation problems.

Multiple Yard Crane Scheduling with Variable Crane Handling Time and Uncertain Yard Truck Arrival Time

Container yard performance heavily depends on the efficient operations of yard cranes. Yong Wu will discuss the multiple yard crane scheduling problem with variable crane handling time and uncertain yard truck arrival time. Here the variable crane handling time refers to the variable time of handling each individual container, while the uncertain yard truck arrival time relates to the actual arrival time of trucks that are dispatched to either pick up or drop off containers. While there is a rich body of literature addresses the multiple yard crane scheduling problem in a deterministic operational context, there is a paucity of research incorporating these uncertain factors.

Dr Yong Wu is a Senior Lecturer at the Department of International Business and Asian Studies within the Griffith Business School. Yong holds a PhD in Operations Research and an MEng in Mechanical Engineering and has worked for The Logistics Institute – Asia Pacific, a joint venture between National University of Singapore and Georgia Institute of Technology (2005-2008), and the Institute for Logistics and Supply Chain Management, Victoria University, Australia (2008-2010). He teaches in the area of logistics and supply chain management and his research interests are in logistics and supply chain management, operations research and engineering optimisation.

Machine learning methods for mineral processing

Machine learning emerged as a subject area in the late 1950s; yet to date there has been little application of machine learning to mineral processing.

There are of course many ways that machine learning can be applied. Stephen Gay will pursue a probabilistic framework, strongly related to the new subbranch of mathematics called information theory.

The approach is to use far less samples than conventional methods and to infer many of the missing variables – indeed to infer the missing variables at a great level of depth (distribution of multimineral particles at each stream). By inferring this information we have a ‘snapshot’ of unit models for each series of plant data. Machine learning algorithms are then applied to parameterise the models according to operational parameters.

Dr. Stephen Gay originally graduated from University of Queensland [BSc (hons/Applied Maths)]. His domain areas have largely been in physical oceanography, mining (PhD), image analysis and geometric probability. The main area of mining is the development of software for optimising mineral processing plants. He received most of his grounding in mathematical modelling for mineral processing at the Julius Kruttschnitt Mineral Research Centre (JKMRC) – and in 2008 development his own independent consulting and contracting business which has since evolved into a startup Company: MIDAS Tech Intl. In 2014 he patented a method that enables the estimation of detailed mineral processing data from simple measurements – and has largely been focusing on getting interest in this new method from Mining Companies and Universities.

FTTx Planning and Design at BAM 2016

FTTx Planning & Design optimisation at BAM 2016

The Biarri Applied Mathematics Conference is on again and registrations are open for 2016. This year FTTx planning and design optimisation is a core component of the free 2-day conference so don’t miss out!

What are Fibre Optic Networks, how do we predict how expensive they will be and why do we do it?

Patrick Edwards will take BAM attendees through the complexities of a fibre network rollout and how it’s not always as straight forward as meets the eye. With billions of dollars being spent around the world on the deployment of these networks Patrick will explore the importance of optimisation and mathematics when predicting costs and different architectures.

Patrick Edwards has a background in mathematics, physics, programming and biochemistry. Patrick enjoys finding new ways to apply the skills from those areas to problems in the FTTx space. By conducting experiments for clients, Patrick helps companies across the telco industry make informed architectural and strategic decisions across their FTTx rollouts.

Why don’t Engineers and Mathematicians get along?

Alex Grime will be looking into the differences in how engineers and mathematicians think and speak across FTTx deployments and how that often gets in the way of successfully leveraging each other’s strengths:

  • Engineers want accurate, mathematicians want precise,
  • Engineers are interested in the destination, mathematicians are interested in the journey,
  • Engineers think 3 dimensionally, mathematicians think n dimensionally.

Alex Grime has over 20 years of experience in the telco industry across Network Strategy, Technology, Planning, Design, Cost Optimisation, and Operations. With a strong history in various roles across Optus, and NBN Alex is now one of the leading Telecommunications consultants for Biarri Networks.

How freedom to innovate is optimising global fibre rollouts.

Laura Smith will be discussing how FTTx networks are now being planned, designed and deployed with greater certainty, speed and at a lower cost by empowering smart mathematical minds. Through the use of optimisation, machine learning and other mathematical techniques, the entire industry is being re-imagined around us– and for the better.

Laura joined Biarri Networks after graduating with a Science degree in 2014. Starting as a member of the design team, she began taking on leadership roles and her focus changed to team development. Laura is passionate about process improvement and thrives on the challenges of working with a wide variety of people and clients.

The BAM Conference 2016

Registrations are now open and this year the conference will be held in Brisbane, Australia, on June 28 and 29 at QUT Gardens Point with support from The Queensland University of Technology, The Australian Mathematical Sciences Institute and Biarri.

Head over to the website to explore the other speakers, presenters and register now!